Archive Conferences and Events

ASMCF Annual Conference 2019

ULIP and The American University of Paris (AUP) will host the annual conference of The Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France (ASMCF) on 4-6th September 2019. The invitation is now open for proposals of papers or panels which address this year's theme: The Transnational City. The Call for Papers can be found here.

Douglas Johnson Memorial Lecture 2019

The Society for the Study of French History and The Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France and Institut Français, Royaume-Uni present the Douglas Johnson Memorial Lecture, Monday 14th January 2019. Too hot to handle? Flora Tristan (1803-1844), campaigner for gender equality Professor Máire Cross (Newcastle University) Flora Tristan was described in the contemporary English and Irish press reporting on France of the 1830s and 40s as an ‘authoress’, ‘female political economist’ and ‘agitator’. One of the first ever to combine a feminist and socialist programme, her 1843 publication Union Ouvrière outsold those of her contemporaries: Proudhon’s Qu’est-ce que la propriété? and Marx’s Manifeste communiste, but those better-known authors scarcely acknowledged her. Her books did not altogether vanish from circulation after her untimely death in 1844, but enough for political activists to refer to her subsequently as a ‘forgotten heroine’. Labelled as a ‘precursor’ to feminism and the ‘cousin of Marx’, her life and work were recorded in depth by a historian of early international socialism, Jules- L Puech and published in 1925. The lecture will explore efforts by activists and historians to recover the memory of Flora Tristan whose brief but intense political career in France illustrates a diverse approach redolent of campaigns of the twenty-first century.

ASMCF Annual Conference 2018

New Forms of Expression in the French and Francophone Worlds. The 2018 annual conference of the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France (ASMCF) took place at Lancaster University from 13-14 September 2018. The event was generously supported by the Yves Hervouet Fund at Lancaster University, the Higher Education, Innovation and Research Department of the French Embassy in London, Taylor and Francis, and the Department of Languages and Cultures at Lancaster University. Keynote speakers: Alexandra Saemmer (Université Paris 8) Nathalie Brillant Rannou (Université Rennes 2)

ASMCF-SSFH Postgraduate Study Day 2018

The annual ASMCF-SSFH Postgraduate Study Day took place this year on 3 March 2018 on the theme of 'Conflict'. Keynote Address: 'La France qui tombe? The origins of a language of crisis in contemporary France', Dr Emile Chabal (Edinburgh)

A Date with History 2017

On the 9th June, the French Embassy and the Institut français du Royaume-Uni launched an exciting new collaboration with York Festival of Ideas - "A Date with History". Bringing together leading historians from France and the UK, A Date with History, this first edition addressed historical perspectives on Europe. Seven selected UK students attended this one day conference.

Comics and Nation 2017

Comics & Nation’, a two-day international event held at Bangor University with the generous support of the ASMCF, brought together scholars working on a variety of cultures and disciplines to provide a forum for the discussion of the interrelation between comic art and nation. The conference placed special emphasis on text/image creation from minority cultures, such as Brittany, Corsica and Picardy in the Francophone context, in this way furthering the understanding of contemporary France. The conference therefore made an important contribution to the thriving field of bande dessinée in French and Francophone studies, and contributed to interdisciplinarity and critical dialogue within subjects in Modern Languages, Celtic Studies, and American Studies. There were around twenty-five attendees across the two days, including fifteen speakers, from the UK, Australia and the USA.

ASMCF Annual Conference 2017

The 2017 ASMCF Annual conference took place at Bangor University from 7-9th September on the theme of 'Work and Play'.

Douglas Johnson Memorial Lecture 2017

The Society for the Study of French History and The Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France and Institut Français, Royaume-Uni present the Douglas Johnson Memorial Lecture, Monday 8th January 2018. Professor Malcolm Crook's lecture will draw on original research into the history of voting in France, whose specific features are further illuminated by a comparison with that of Britain. The lecture will explore the relatively neglected subject of how people cast their votes rather than who was elected, by focusing on three important questions. First, turnout: just how many of those progressively enfranchised from the late eighteenth century onwards responded positively to the opportunity to make their choice of representatives at different levels of the electoral process, and why has non-voting recently become more pronounced? Second, secrecy: taken for granted today, why was the vote cast in public, even orally, for much of the nineteenth century when the vote was cast in public, and why was this openness stoutly defended in some quarters until the later advent of ballot papers, polling booths, envelopes and isoloirs? Thirdly, and finally, spoiling: in the second round of the presidential contest in France last June, why did no less than four million people submit a blank or annotated paper, knowing it would not count? This subversive practice, which seems to be catching on in Britain, has a long history on the far side of the Channel. In conclusion, like other aspects of voting culture, does it testify to an enduring vitality in the way the French people express their sovereignty?

ASMCF Annual Conference 2018

New Forms of Expression in the French and Francophone Worlds The 2018 annual conference of the Association for the Study of Modern and Contemporary France (ASMCF) will take place at Lancaster University from 13-14 September 2018. The event has been generously supported by the Yves Hervouet Fund at Lancaster University, the Higher Education, Innovation and Research Department of the French Embassy in London, Taylor and Francis, and the Department of Languages and Cultures at Lancaster University.

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